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The Book Thread


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#1521 scorpio

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 12:12 PM

I found him to be rather funny in a psycho kind of way. His observations were so droll. What a master manipulator. I always enjoy a reread of Lolita. Well at least until the end when the whole thing unravels and Humbert goes off the deep end. Then it becomes tedious, somewhat. But a beautifully written book about an ugly subject, for sure.
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#1522 Flawless Calculations

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Posted 06 June 2015 - 01:54 PM

So I have a habit when I'm reading of being generally credulous - I let the narrator tell me whatever he wants and I just go with it. I don't question much. And with my first couple reads, I found myself totally going with what Humbert was saying, but this time around I think I'm being a little more critical of him and realizing how creepy a lot of his actions are. And how much of a jerk he is to almost everyone. In the past I've totally let him manipulate me into thinking he was something of a victim, but this time around I'm not buying it as much, for whatever reason (maybe just because I've read it a couple times before).

 

Re-reading books is always really interesting and often rewarding. It's fun to see whether things hold up or get better or get worse.


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#1523 bro do u even give back to the community

bro do u even give back to the community

Posted 08 June 2015 - 04:00 PM

the magic mountain will take me a very very long time to read


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#1524 rpmlem

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Posted 08 June 2015 - 04:26 PM

yeah, but it'll be glorious. best book i read last year, easily.


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#1525 stray dreams

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 07:28 AM

I started Don Quixote last week. Enjoying it so far, but it's gonna take me a million years to finish cause I don't have much time to read during the day. Is it worth sticking out?
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#1526 Flawless Calculations

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Posted 21 July 2015 - 07:27 PM

Fuck man, White Noise is so good. Second time through it, but the first time was years ago. First time it didn't do it for me but this time it is totally doing it for me. Am now big Delillo fan. I can't even describe why it works for me. It's something about how he details the constant sensory bombardment you get just from being alive and the feelings it gives you. Sad feelings and exhausted feelings but sometimes you can just dive into it and forget all your troubles. This book specifically has made me think about family, spectacle, and consumerism. And all of those thoughts are very nuanced - not just simple dumb thoughts like 'consumerism sucks!' - the book acknowledges that sometimes consumerism totally doesn't suck. It has touched on a lot of things that I've thought about a lot before, but it twists it just a bit and makes me see them from a fresh perspective. Enjoyable read. Unfortunately I'm almost done with it. :(

 

Edit: And authority - this book is making me think a lot about authority and what it's made up of. What gives someone authority? A lot of the time there is no good reason for someone to have authority, but that doesn't mean that it's not important that somebody has it. There's a lot of comfort to be taken from a person in authority - someone who steps up to the plate. I'm finding the book to be full of ideas like this.


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#1527 Shambler

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Posted 07 September 2015 - 06:48 PM

was going through my old books from Birmingham and found this

 

51T6Zb8%2BfqL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jp

 

been reading it for a few days.

 

turns out, the origin of European genocide is Europe. woww!


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#1528 alphabets

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Posted 08 September 2015 - 03:02 PM

Exterminate All the Brutes should have been the title to Elliot Rodger's youtube compilation


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#1529 Voted #31 Poster

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 07:39 PM

This place is literally the deadest corner of the internet, but I'll post anyway...

 

So I torrented everything by Faulkner, where do I begin? or What is your top 3?


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#1530 Flawless Calculations

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Posted 01 October 2015 - 06:05 AM

This place is literally the deadest corner of the internet, but I'll post anyway...

 

So I torrented everything by Faulkner, where do I begin? or What is your top 3?

I think probably starting with his short stories would be a good idea. I've read Go Down, Moses and a couple of his more famous novels, and I think that if you like the short stories, then you'll like the novels too. He's a difficult read but I think not as difficult as advertised. I guess even when I don't know what's going on he still makes it a pleasure to read because there's a really strong vibe to all his stuff. He takes you to Faulknerland and the atmosphere is heavy. Rereads work well for him.

 

Enjoy! I'm actually thinking about getting more Faulkner as soon as I finish what I'm working on now. I still haven't read Absalom and I'm feeling like a real philistine.


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#1531 Bright Shining Lie

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Posted 01 October 2015 - 09:41 AM

Absalom, Absalom, Light in August, and The Sound and the Fury are his best novels and fairly elevated above the rest of his oeuvre. the lattest is probably the best starting point, shortest, easiest to discern, say hello to the Compson family who will pop up here and there in his other works, and William stated it was the work he most loved. never held his short fiction for much, his prose needs room to breathe and his narratives time to develop and both are constrained by the format


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#1532 rpmlem

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Posted 01 October 2015 - 10:50 AM

Faulknerland 

 

Yoknapatawpha?

 

 

Milo's picks are my three favorites too.


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#1533 Voted #31 Poster

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Posted 01 October 2015 - 09:18 PM

Can always count on milo to pull out "oeuvre" at the slightest opportunity. Thanks for the rec's guys


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#1534 rpmlem

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Posted 01 October 2015 - 10:21 PM

You're telling me. I asked him once where the bookstore was and he said, "it's right oeuvre there by the movie theater." 

 

 

 

 

 

Curious about the Nobel Prize for Literature, which will be announced within the next week or two. Modiano was a nice surprise for me in this past year, regardless of whether the award actually means anything (to me it does...I've found innumerable writers that I love through searching past winners). I just like being introduced to someone new.


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#1535 rpmlem

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Posted 17 October 2015 - 11:26 AM

On December 5th of 1921, future-Nobel laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winning author William Faulkner landed a job as a University of Mississippi postmaster. Despite numerous reports of his writing novels on the job, losing and occasionally throwing away mail, ignoring colleagues and customers, playing bridge during opening hours, and regularly turning up late only to leave early, Faulkner somehow held the position for almost three years — until, in September of 1924, a predictably unflattering inspection resulted in him being forced to resign.

He wrote the following letter to his superiors.

(Source: Conversations with William Faulkner & Thomas Lee; Image: William Faulkner in 1940, via LIFE.)

[October, 1924]

As long as I live under the capitalistic system, I expect to have my life influenced by the demands of moneyed people. But I will be damned if I propose to be at the beck and call of every itinerant scoundrel who has two cents to invest in a postage stamp. 

This, sir, is my resignation.

(Signed)
 

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